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Depositordc.contributorRemijsen, Bert
Funderdc.contributor.otherVolkswagen Foundationen_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialSSen_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialSOUTH SUDANen_UK
Time Perioddc.coverage.temporalstart=2014-08-29; end=2014-08-29; scheme=W3C-DTFen
Data Creatordc.creatorGwado Ayoker, Otto
Data Creatordc.creatorRemijsen, Bert
Date Accessioneddc.date.accessioned2014-10-13T12:14:06Z
Date Availabledc.date.available2014-10-13T12:14:06Z
Date Issueddc.date.issued2014-10-13
Citationdc.identifier.citationGwado Ayoker, Otto; Remijsen, Bert. (2014). OttoGwadoAyoker_songJalabias, 2014 [sound]. University of Edinburgh. School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences. Linguistics and English Language. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/40.en
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10283/639
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/40
Dataset Description (abstract)dc.description.abstractThe recording at the center of this item is a Shilluk song. The composer of this song is Amon Tuk Kaal, from Oryang Village, in Mwomo District in the far north. He he was jailed by the Chief of Mwomo for burning the grass in Mwomo plains and dividing it among the people who wanted to cultivate, including non-Shilluks. And when King Kur (1951-1974) went to Mwomo on a visit,Tuk Kaal presented his case in a song which he called Ogwal Ámag yi Ogwal, which means A Frog Caught A Frog” [NB That song is also part of the Collection of Shilluk narratives and songs, performed by Owacci Obwonyo Anay.] The King then released him. Tuk Kaal did not stay in his village after he was released. He was afraid of the chief. So, he went to live in Melut, on the eastern side of the Nile. There in Melut, he became a Muslim. Tuk Kaal was a composer, and his song, ‘ogwal ámag yi ogwal’ made him very popular indeed, because he was encouraging agriculture. [NB That song is also part of the Collection of Shilluk narratives and songs, performed by Owacci Obwonyo Anay - http://datashare.is.ed.ac.uk/handle/10283/543.] He made a mistake by becoming a Muslim. When one becomes a Muslim, he/she must change his/her way of life, and be dressed in jalabia. The composer in this song is urging the Shilluks not to wear the lawø, especially the 'áwaangkaajø'. 'Áwaangkaajø' is a (lawø) cloth worn on the shoulder but it is not big enough to cover the whole body. Shilluk people fought with the Arab Muslims for a long time because they do not accept Islam. Shilluk even consider a circumcised person as defiled. Tuk Kaal became a caller (the man who shouts calling Muslims for prayers) but he failed to convert any Shilluk man to Islam. He made a sharp turn from good to worse. The Shilluk people did not forgive him although he composed songs in which he says that it was a mistake for him to accept circumcision.en_UK
Dataset Description (TOC)dc.description.tableofcontentsThis item consists of a recorded Shilluk song (wav file), accompanied with annotation (in Praat TextGrid) and associated information: metadata, permissions and speaker questionnaire. The associated information is also summarized, in a spreadsheet. The TextGrid annotation includes Shilluk orthography, translation, and comments.en_UK
Publisherdc.publisherUniversity of Edinburgh. School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences. Linguistics and English Languageen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectShilluken_UK
Subjectdc.subjectoral cultureen_UK
Subject Classificationdc.subject.classificationEastern Asiatic African American and Australasian Languages Literature and related subjects::African Language studiesen_UK
Titledc.titleOttoGwadoAyoker_songJalabiasen_UK
Typedc.typesounden_UK

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