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Depositordc.contributorRemijsen, Bert
Funderdc.contributor.otherVolkswagen Foundationen_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialSSen_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialSOUTH SUDANen_UK
Time Perioddc.coverage.temporalstart=2014-02-08; end=2014-02-08; scheme=W3C-DTFen
Data Creatordc.creatorGwado Ayoker, Otto
Data Creatordc.creatorRemijsen, Bert
Date Accessioneddc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T15:07:01Z
Date Availabledc.date.available2014-03-04T15:07:01Z
Date Issueddc.date.issued2014-03-04
Citationdc.identifier.citationGwado Ayoker, Otto; Remijsen, Bert. (2014). JeremiahJwokpapyejGay_songKebDance, 2014 [sound]. University of Edinburgh. School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences. Linguistics and English Language. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/17.en
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10283/533
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/17
Dataset Description (abstract)dc.description.abstractThe recording at the center of this item is a song. In the dry season, in Chollo Land, the weather becomes very hot and nights are long. So, the youth gather in an open space (thwørø), usually between two villages, but youth from many villages join the dance. They spend the night dancing keb. Keb is a dance in which people dance in very big circles. The village that leads the dance forms the inner circle. There is no drum but the person who leads the song must have a strong voice, sometimes the song is led by two people. When the first village finishes, then another village takes the inner circle. When all the villages finish their turns, then people sit down in a wider circle and amagak begins. In amagak people clap their hands as they sing. And girls go to choose the men to dance with. Then another village takes the song, and another village, until all the villages take their turns, then the keb disperses. If the villages are many, the dance would continue up to 3:00 or 4:00am. This song was a warning to somebody called by his mother’s name; wäd Nyatyenø, because he was living with his maternal uncles in Nyibanyo. This young man was trying to cause the keb to disperse. The youth of Nyibodo would not allow him to do so, and they threaten to follow them to the Olaang Brook, and they will fight Nyibanyo there. This happened in Akewnom, the open space between Nyibodo and Ayijdhajo in Tonga.en_UK
Dataset Description (TOC)dc.description.tableofcontentsThis item consists of a recorded Shilluk song (wav file), accompanied with annotation (in Praat TextGrid) and associated information: metadata, permissions and speaker questionnaire. The associated information is also summarized, in a spreadsheet. The TextGrid annotation includes Shilluk orthography, translation, and comments.en_UK
Publisherdc.publisherUniversity of Edinburgh. School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences. Linguistics and English Languageen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectShilluken_UK
Subjectdc.subjectoral cultureen_UK
Subject Classificationdc.subject.classificationEastern Asiatic African American and Australasian Languages Literature and related subjects::African Language studiesen_UK
Titledc.titleJeremiahJwokpapyejGay_songKebDanceen_UK
Typedc.typesounden_UK

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