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Depositordc.contributorGreiner, Danny-Lee
Funderdc.contributor.otherUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialMt Merapi, Indonesiaen_UK
Data Creatordc.creatorGreiner, Danny-Lee
Data Creatordc.creatorSun, Jin
Data Creatordc.creatorBarker, Thomas
Date Accessioneddc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T17:51:46Z
Date Availabledc.date.available2020-06-22T17:51:46Z
Citationdc.identifier.citationGreiner, Danny-Lee; Sun, Jin; Barker, Thomas. (2020). Investigating PDC Flow using DEM Simulations., [dataset]. University of Edinburgh. School of Engineering. Institute for Infrastructure and Environment. https://doi.org/10.7488/ds/2853.en
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10283/3672
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.7488/ds/2853
Dataset Description (abstract)dc.description.abstractPyroclastic Density Currents are hazardous, geophysical flows arising from volcanic activity that pose a significant risk to communities in close proximity to volcanoes. Their destructive nature is partly attributed to their incredible mobility, which allows them to reach exceptional distances. Due to their complexity, limited optical depth, unpredictable nature and dangerous conditions, the study of the dynamics of PDCs relies on a combination of field studies, experiments and numerical modelling. By implementing models that investigate the energy dissipation occurring at the particle scale, a better understanding of their mobility and runout can be achieved. This report uses a 2D Discrete Element Method approach with a non-cohesive contact model to simulate granular flow down a rough inclined plane with changing inclinations between 20-30 degrees to investigate real aspects of changing topography and its effect on runout distance. Higher inclinations had the greatest kinetic energy and during deposition, the uppermost layers of flow had the longest runout. The depositional phase during deceleration on horizontal slopes shows a backward accretion of particles, consistent with other findings. The results validated conceptual models derived from field studies at Mt Merapi and are in agreement with previous DEM models. The applicability of these results extends to rockfall avalanches that share a similar particle nature.en_UK
Languagedc.language.isoengen_UK
Publisherdc.publisherUniversity of Edinburgh. School of Engineering. Institute for Infrastructure and Environmenten_UK
Relation (Is Referenced By)dc.relation.isreferencedbyUniversity of Edinburgh MEng thesis: Greiner, Danny-Lee.Pyroclastic Density Currents, understanding the deadly flow from volcanic eruptions.en_UK
Rightsdc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public Licenseen
Subjectdc.subjectGranular flowen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectDEMen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectPyroclastic flowen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectDiscrete Element Methoden_UK
Subjectdc.subjectPyroclastic density currentsen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectVolcanic eruptionen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectGeophysical flowen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectHazardous flowen_UK
Subject Classificationdc.subject.classificationPhysical Sciencesen_UK
Titledc.titleInvestigating PDC Flow using DEM Simulations.en_UK
Alternative Titledc.title.alternativePyroclastic Density Currents, understanding the deadly flow from volcanic eruptionsen_UK
Typedc.typedataseten_UK

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