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Depositordc.contributorFletcher-Watson, Sue
Funderdc.contributor.otherUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
Data Creatordc.creatorHampton, Sarah
Data Creatordc.creatorFletcher-Watson, Sue
Date Accessioneddc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T12:24:14Z
Date Availabledc.date.available2018-10-02T12:24:14Z
Citationdc.identifier.citationHampton, Sarah; Fletcher-Watson, Sue. (2018). The potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention: processed data set, [dataset]. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh Medical School. DART lab. https://doi.org/10.7488/ds/2450.en
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10283/3194
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.7488/ds/2450
Dataset Description (abstract)dc.description.abstractThis data set accompanies an article published in Nature Scientific Reports: Fletcher-Watson, S., & Hampton, S. (2018) The potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention. Nature Scientific Reports, DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-32444-9 Participants were presented with a range of static visual stimuli and their eye positions recorded at a rate of 60Hz. From these raw data we extracted information about the duration, location and timing of fixations. Data are organised by area of interest (a defined region of the stimulus - e.g. the face of someone depicted in a photo) and stimulus. For each variable type, means are calculated across multiple stimuli within a category (e.g. low, medium and high complexity stimuli) and for each type of area of interest (e.g. people, objects). The data are processed from raw output from a Tobii X60 eye-tracker. Three spreadsheets provide: 1. total fixation durations for each stimulus, and each area of interest within a stimulus 2. time to first fixate (i.e. duration from stimulus onset to first fixation made in a specific area of interest), for each stimulus and area of interest within a stimulus. 3. fixations before (i.e. the number of individual fixations made before the first fixation in a specific area of interest), for each stimulus and area of interest within a stimulus. Data are produced in two blocks of rows, representing data collected at timepoint 1 and timepoint 2. A fourth tab provides a glossary of all variable labels and colour codes.en_UK
Languagedc.language.isoengen_UK
Publisherdc.publisherUniversity of Edinburgh. Edinburgh Medical School. DART laben_UK
Relation (Is Referenced By)dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32444-9en_UK
Rightsdc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public Licenseen
Subjectdc.subjectoutcome measurementen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectpsychologyen_UK
Subjectdc.subjecteye-trackingen_UK
Subjectdc.subjecteye movementsen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectattentionen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectchild developmenten_UK
Subject Classificationdc.subject.classificationPsychologyen_UK
Titledc.titleThe potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention: processed data seten_UK
Alternative Titledc.title.alternativeFletcher-Watson&Hampton_eye-tracking_outcome_measure_fixation_dataen_UK
Typedc.typedataseten_UK

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