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Depositordc.contributorBanas, Kasia
Funderdc.contributor.otherWellcome Trusten_UK
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialUKen
Spatial Coveragedc.coverage.spatialUNITED KINGDOMen
Time Perioddc.coverage.temporalstart=2015-11-04; end=2015-11-05; scheme=W3C-DTFen
Data Creatordc.creatorNewman, Emily
Data Creatordc.creatorBanas, Kasia
Date Accessioneddc.date.accessioned2016-06-13T16:26:25Z
Date Availabledc.date.available2016-06-13T16:26:25Z
Citationdc.identifier.citationNewman, Emily; Banas, Kasia. (2016). Female identity threat and eating, 2015, 2015 [dataset]. University of Edinburgh. School of Health in Social Science. Clinical Psychology. https://doi.org/10.7488/ds/1426.en
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10283/2032
Persistent Identifierdc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.7488/ds/1426
Dataset Description (abstract)dc.description.abstractHeart disease is the leading cause of death among men and unhealthy diets are a known contributing factor. UK policies such as front of pack labelling of food products and campaigns such as "Be food smart" are aimed to promote healthy eating practices. Data show that men benefit from these interventions less than women. One possible mechanism is that social norms about masculinity encourage men to eat meals rich in red meat and potatoes, and low on vegetables. We propose two Internet-based studies to test the hypothesis that in situations where men's masculinity is threatened, they will tend to choose foods that are perceived as more masculine, and that are also less healthy. In the first study, participants would rate food items (see The student diet 2014) on three scales: masculinity/femininity, healthiness/unhealthiness and palatability. In this, the second (experimental) study, male and female participants were randomly assigned to a gender identity threat or a gender identity affirmation condition (using the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory (CFNI), and then requested to choose between different food items. The prediction is that, following a masculinity threat, men would choose more masculine and less healthy foods, compared to the gender affirmation condition. We expect this effect not to occur among women. The snowball sample of 127 female respondents was conducted online via Qualtrics.en_UK
Dataset Description (TOC)dc.description.tableofcontents1 microdata file (127 respondents, 164 variables) and accompanying documentation (MS Word)en_UK
Languagedc.language.isoengen_UK
Publisherdc.publisherUniversity of Edinburgh. School of Health in Social Science. Clinical Psychologyen_UK
Rightsdc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public Licenseen
Subjectdc.subjectfood choicesen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectfeminine identityen_UK
Subjectdc.subjectidentity threaten_UK
Subjectdc.subjectConformity to Feminine Norms Inventory (CFNI)en_UK
Subject Classificationdc.subject.classificationSubjects allied to Medicineen_UK
Titledc.titleFemale identity threat and eating, 2015en_UK
Typedc.typedataseten_UK

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